Parkland Hospital – Dallas, Texas

When it was time to replace the Parkland Memorial Hospital—a Dallas, Texas landmark constructed in 1954, everyone recognized they would be undertaking a high-profile project. This became even more apparent when the plans for a new Parkland Hospital were unveiled: a 2.1 million square-foot, 17 story, 862 bed, full-service acute care facility located on a 64 acre healthcare campus. The $1.33 billion project resulted in one of the largest healthcare facilities ever constructed as a single project.

The new hospital featured flat rooftops at multiple levels that all needed to be made watertight for decades to come. The roofing system needed to be designed in a way that accounted for a helipad, consistent rooftop traffic, extensive rooftop equipment, lightwells and various utility platforms. A lot stood in the way of Anchor Roofing, the installer, but the meticulous planning for the project meant that all contingencies had been considered by the time application of the waterproofing system began.

After installing insulation, SOPREMA vapor barrier and SOPRABOARD®, the Anchor Roofing team started on the two ply roofing application. They first put down a layer of SOPRALENE® Flam 180 SBS-modified bitumen base-ply membrane to provide waterproofing protection for the building. Then SOPRASTAR™ Flam SBS-modified bitumen reflective cap ply layer was installed. SOPRASTAR Flam offered a highly reflective, functionally strong and long-lasting cap ply. This helped in contributing to the hospital’s achievement of LEED Gold status from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Another benefit to this roof is that the waterproofing system can be easily refreshed 25–30 years down the road to extend the roof’s lifecycle without a full tear-off. The foundation of the system can stay intact while the top layer is rejuvenated, giving the option for an additional warranty and ensuring the building is protected against the elements for another 20–30 years. This not only helps the health system to save money in the long run and avoid contributing unnecessary waste to landfills, but also helps the hospital avoid disruption to operations in a sensitive environment where recovering patients must be protected from invasive construction processes.